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Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

“V” For Victory!

Monday, August 1st, 2011

La Jolla Historical Museum has hired BANG! Creative for the planning, design and implementation of their coming exhibition; Homefront – La Jolla, An American Community During the Second World War, opening on Dec 7, 2011. The design will include logo, multi-media integration and graphics design for the 1,200 SF exhibition.

 

Third Move Is A Charm

Monday, August 1st, 2011

BANG! Creative, Inc. is expanding its offices and moving Sept 1, 2011 to 2835 Camino Vida Roble.      “The additional office space will accommodate Noel Lane and George Bralla – new Project Directors. Sean Laflin, President of BANG! Creative elaborates more news “…and Shane Laflin – new Product Development Manager for a new company to be announced shortly”.

 

Coming To An Energy Show Near You

Monday, August 1st, 2011

The California Center for Sustainable Energy has awarded BANG! Creative the design    and fabrication contract for their new statewide Energy Upgrade California Product      Showcase. The customized mobile trailer will display the latest in sustainable building products, best-practices building methods and high efficiency HVAC, Solar Panel and                 air handling systems”.

 

BANG! Creative Awarded New Project

Monday, June 13th, 2011

The State of California, Department of Parks and Recreation, Santa Cruz District             has awarded BANG! Creative, Inc. a contract to provide planning, exhibit design             and fabrication for the Santa Cruz Mission State Historic Park.

New ‘Cellular Journey’ Exhibit At the Fleet Science Center

Tuesday, February 15th, 2011

February 15, 2011

SAN DIEGO, CA– “Cellular Journey” is the Fleet’s all-new hands on exhibition made possible by the Life Technologies Foundation. The exhibit, opening on Saturday, March 19, 2011, will expand visitor’s knowledge and appreciation of human cell biology, the importance of stem cells and the potential impact of stems cells on medical research in the fields of regenerative and personalized medicine.

Interactive exhibit features include “Journey Inside a Cell,” which will lead the viewer through an informative and graphically exciting survey of the structural design of a human cell, examining the variety of cell structures and functions most common associated with cell function.

You can use a microscope at the “From Tissues to Cells” exhibit to examine various human tissue samples. You’ll learn about four different types of tissues – epithelial, connective, muscle and nerve – and how they each carry out a specific function.

The “You are a Scientist” exhibit will include interactives that will simulate stem cell research where visitors can try and secure a stem cell, and move the cell to a “petri dish”.

*This exhibition is ongoing and will be added to the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center’s permanent collection.

KPBS.org

So WATT! An Illuminating Look at Energy

Sunday, October 10th, 2010

Oct 10, 2010

San Diego, CA – “So WATT! An Illuminating Look at Energy” is a new hands-on exhibition at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center focusing on electricity production, alternative sources of energy, and basic conservation strategies you can try at home and at work.

“So WATT!” features five interactive exhibits, including a touch-screen interface where you can monitor electricity being generated by 10,000 square feet of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels on the roof of the Science Center. Owned and operated by SDG&E, the PV system is capable of generating more than 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity at peak production for San Diego’s power grid.

Generate your own electricity at the “Make a Watt” exhibit and learn how much energy it takes to produce a watt. At “Watt’s the Difference?” you’ll will learn more about the six most common ways electricity is produced – fossil fuels, nuclear, hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, and solar – then find out where most of California’s power comes from. Every form of energy production has pros and cons, and after learning a bit about these impacts, you’ll have an opportunity to vote for the energy source YOU think should be used most for generating electricity in the next 20 years.

Ever wonder how solar panels work? At the “Watt’s in the Sun?” exhibit, solar power is demystified with a down-to-earth explanation of how photovoltaic (PV) panels produce electricity from sunlight. You can be a solar engineer at this exhibit by adjusting a small photovoltaic (PV) panel, lining it up with a light source and creating enough electricity to power a small fan. Nearby, an interactive touch-screen exhibit called “Watt’s on the Roof?” lets you investigate real-time and historical data on how much electricity is being produced by the Fleet’s rooftop PV system.

“Watt about Me?” is an interactive exhibit that demonstrates a wide variety of simple ways to conserve electricity at home and at work. By flipping switches on a scale model of a “typical house,” you’ll discover how the energy consumption level changes as you implement various conservation measures.

Produced by Reuben H. Fleet Science Center staff, “So WATT! An Illuminating Look at Energy” features a bilingual exhibition brochure, with exhibit descriptions and scientific explanations presented in Spanish. Made possible by grants from San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) and Shell Trading with additional support from the Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation, the “So WATT!” exhibition will remain on display at the Fleet Science Center indefinitely.

Fleet Science Center and SDG&E Unveil Solar Panel Installation and Interactive Exhibition

Tuesday, October 21st, 2008

SAN DIEGO, CA – April 23, 2007 — The Reuben H. Fleet Science Center and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E) today unveiled the installation of more than 10,000 square feet of solar panels on the roof of the Science Center. The project will generate clean electricity for San Diego and serve as the centerpiece of an upcoming interactive exhibition on alternative energy.

The result of a partnership between the Fleet Science Center, SDG&E and the City of San Diego, the new solar photovoltaic (PV) system will produce more than 100 kilowatts (kW) of clean energy at peak production – enough electricity to light 1,700 60-watt bulbs or power about 65 homes. SDG&E will own and operate the solar panels, so the electricity generated will feed the region’s power grid, not just the Fleet.

This contribution of clean solar energy will eliminate about 60 tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere each year. Scientists are now convinced that carbon dioxide is one of the primary agents contributing to global warming.

In addition to generating clean electricity, the solar panel system will be the centerpiece of a new hands-on science exhibition at the Fleet called “So WATT! An Illuminating Look at Energy” scheduled to open this August. Designed and built by BANG! Creative, Inc. and Reuben H. Fleet Science Center staff, and made possible by grants from SDG&E, Shell Trading and the Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation, the exhibition will take visitors on a guided tour of solar power and other “green” sources of electricity. The exhibition also will introduce visitors to the basics of electricity and offer tips on how people can conserve energy at home and at work.

The Reuben H. Fleet Science Center has already made major progress in reducing its impact on the environment, including projects that have dramatically reduced energy and water consumption. In fact, the Fleet uses less electricity today than it did before its 1998 expansion, which doubled the size of the facility. Moreover, the Fleet is currently in the process of obtaining LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

More details about the upcoming “So WATT! An Illuminating Look at Energy” exhibition will be available this spring. Preliminary design schematics and renderings of the exhibition are available from the Fleet Science Center upon request.

So WATT! An Illuminating Look at Energy

Tuesday, October 21st, 2008

“So WATT! An Illuminating Look at Energy” is a new hands-on exhibition at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center focusing on electricity production, alternative sources of energy, and basic conservation strategies you can try at home and at work.

“So WATT!” features five interactive exhibits, including a touch-screen interface where you can monitor electricity being generated by 10,000 square feet of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels on the roof of the Science Center. Owned and operated by SDG&E, the PV system is capable of generating more than 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity at peak production for San Diego’s power grid.

Generate your own electricity at the “Make a Watt” exhibit and learn how much energy it takes to produce a watt. At “Watt’s the Difference?” you’ll will learn more about the six most common ways electricity is produced – fossil fuels, nuclear, hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, and solar – then find out where most of California’s power comes from.

Every form of energy production has pros and cons, and after learning a bit about these impacts, you’ll have an opportunity to vote for the energy source YOU think should be used most for generating electricity in the next 20 years.

Ever wonder how solar panels work? At the “Watt’s in the Sun?” exhibit, solar power is demystified with a down-to-earth explanation of how photovoltaic (PV) panels produce electricity from sunlight. You can be a solar engineer at this exhibit by adjusting a small photovoltaic (PV) panel, lining it up with a light source and creating enough electricity to power a small fan.

Nearby, an interactive touch-screen exhibit called “Watt’s on the Roof?” lets you investigate real-time and historical data on how much electricity is being produced by the Fleet’s rooftop PV system.

“Watt about Me?” is an interactive exhibit that demonstrates a wide variety of simple ways to conserve electricity at home and at work. By flipping switches on a scale model of a “typical house,” you’ll discover how the energy consumption level changes as you implement various conservation measures.

Designed and fabricated by BANG! Creative, Inc. and produced by Reuben H. Fleet Science Center staff, “So WATT! An Illuminating Look at Energy” features a bilingual exhibition brochure, with exhibit descriptions and scientific explanations presented in Spanish. Made possible by grants from San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) and Shell Trading with additional support from the Kenneth T. and Eileen L. Norris Foundation, the “So WATT!” exhibition will remain on display at the Fleet Science Center indefinitely.

See New Exhibits at Pigeon Point Lighthouse!

Tuesday, October 21st, 2008

Pescadero, CA— In 1872, a new lighthouse sent its beams upon the sea to reveal a safe passageway for seafaring souls. In December 2001, a section of the cornice on the exterior of the lighthouse fell off. Since that time, the lighthouse has been closed, and tours of the lighthouse ceased.

In 2007, new exhibits “light up” the Fog Signal Building showing visitors the history of the West Coast’s tallest lighthouse. The exhibits tell the stories of the lighthouse, its keepers, and the ships that have gone down, including the downed clipper ship Carrier Pigeon, which gave Pigeon Point its name. The new exhibits allow visitors to experience the stories of the coast, and a model lighthouse helps visitors take a closer “look” at the tower.

Pigeon Point Lighthouse stands at an astounding 115 feet in height, with its First-Order, 8 thousand pound Frenel Lens containing 1,008 glass prisms. The exhibits were developed as part of a joint project with NOAA, the San Mateo Coast Natural Historical Association and California State Parks. Exhibits fabricated by Sean Laflin of Bang! Creative and the exhibit text written by Maritime researcher JoAnn Semones.

For more information, please contact Park Interpreter Jeff Barnes at 831-464-5620. California State Parks

Come explore the coast and stop in to see the new exhibits Fridays through Sundays from 10:30am to 4pm. Pigeon Point Lighthouse is 28 miles North of Santa Cruz, and 7 miles South of Pescadero off Hwy. #1. For more information, please call 650-879-2120.

Pigeon Point Lighthouse Exhibit Opening

Tuesday, October 21st, 2008

PIGEON POINT — Some visitors see the Pigeon Point lighthouse as an object of curiosity, a relic of a bygone era. But for a small group of Coastside families, it was home. Bob Davis’ aunt, now deceased, grew up on the grounds of Pigeon Point, where her father had the all-important role of lighthouse keeper in the 1920s and 1930s.

He was responsible for making sure the light at the top of the tower was lit, that the foghorn blew at regular intervals and that no ships ran aground on the rocky shoals, which often were shrouded in fog. The Fresnel lens lighting will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. The popular annual event typically draws 3,000 locals, who park by the road and take in the 135-year-old lens’s starburst-like projections.

The lens actually is made up of 1,008 small lenses, which revolve mechanically and project a distinctive flash of light every 10 seconds. “They were such an incredible engineering feat of the time,” said Paul Keel, local supervising ranger with California State Parks, referring to the Fresnel lenses that were designed for many Northern California lighthouses built in the 1870s.

The Pigeon Point lighthouse is the oldest functioning one in California, built as it was in 1872 amid an outcry over the great number of ships running aground at the foot of the cliff, killing dozens of passengers and crewmen.

A century later, use of the Fresnel lens was discontinued — along with the tradition of the lighthouse keeper — made redundant by automation and the Coast Guard’s ability to monitor the lighthouse from elsewhere.

The new interactive museum exhibit aims to bring much of that period to life, with colorful displays about the Fresnel lens, the historic shipwrecks of Pigeon Point, and the lighthouse keepers and their duties. One section of the exhibit allows visitors to push a button and hear different fog horn signals, since each lighthouse was distinct. Another area contains a 3-foot-tall, cutaway replica of the lighthouse so people can explore what’s inside it (the actual lighthouse has been closed to visitors since it was damaged in 2001).

Semones wrote all the text for the exhibit, and the original research she did took her three years to complete. She was the one who tracked down the families of former lighthouse keepers and invited them to the event on Saturday.
“It’s living history. There’s something here that you can see and touch and picture,” said Semones. “I think it brings alive the history of the lighthouse and the way coastal life used to be.”

Staff writer Julia Scott Oakland Tribune, Nov 16, 2007